Oh snap, Ginger

“When dangerous play time gets real, everyone suddenly becomes mature.” This is the line I remembered most from the film because it basically sums up and describes everything that happens in the story. We learn from the story that although we may have fun and play around in life, there will come a point when we’ll have to shape up and fit ourselves in this society. This is one of the horrible truths about being an adult, having to conform to what society says in order to survive.

As much as we see this film and think that the source of all conflict roots from Ginger being a werewolf, the dialogues between the two sisters are similar to the ones regular teenage girls have when they’re battling with insecurities and puberty. People do say that teenage girls tend to become such monsters with all their raging hormones and discoveries. Perhaps the film could be seen as literally portraying the monsters girls are on the inside.

“Something’s wrong, like more than you being female.” When Ginger gets bitten, strange changes start to occur with her body and her attitude– which conveniently happens as she is also experiencing her very first period. She starts to be interested in boys and is concerned with her looks– things that happen to most teenage girls, only Ginger experiences this pretty late already. Brigitte, however, finds these changes to be horrible for their sister-relationship and for her sister herself. As Ginger also slowly transforms into a werewolf, Brigitte is the character in charge of finding out how to defeat this horrifying infection. We rejoice when she does find the cure, thanks to the pothead friend of hers that she makes (which is funny if you analyze that just like in Cabin In The Woods, the pothead is once again the savior), but then fall into frustration as she fails at injecting her sister in time. Although we don’t (well, I don’t) understand the ending of the film, whether or not they both died together just as they planned to anyway, we try to soften the absurdity by saying “Awww these sisters just loved each other so much.” 

Another perspective in the film is that of the mother whose role and duty is to try to understand her daughters who didn’t take after her. Like all mothers, she tries to discipline her children without losing their respect or love but ends up letting them do what they want in order for them to like her. The only time we see a shared characteristic between them is towards the end of the film when the mother suggests they burn their house down and run away from town. In a way, her suggesting that was another one of the comical moments in the movie.

“You think I wanna go back to being nobody?” When jokes are placed aside, we find ourselves revealing our deepest truths. That’s what scares people the most, having to be honest with how they really feel because they think it leads to rejection. As we think that since Ginger gets her period first, she is to become the adult-minded one ahead of Brigitte, but as the story progresses, we see Brigitte taking on more responsibilities for her careless sister. When we’re scared of a certain consequence, we find ourselves thinking straight and more determined to getting out of the inconvenient situation. 

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I would also just like to share that these two sister actresses also had another pair role in a movie with a completely opposite genre: Another Cinderella Story. They play idiot- and not-so-evil sisters of the Cinderella in the movie who also try their best to be the “cool” girls in the school by throwing great parties and flashing their wealth. From playing dirty-looking and antisocial high schoolers to loud and energetic annoying teenagers, these two actresses should continue doing more movies together, being the great tandem that they are!

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