Slutlig skräckfilm: Låt Den Rätte Komma In

0

The movie, Let The Right One In, stands more as a romantic movie than a horror movie. The romantic situation between the two main characters were more of a focus than the infliction of horror to its viewer.

The movie focuses on the development between the characters Oskar, a very passive boy and Eli, a very imposing vampire girl. Their relationship grows as they become close through their nightly meetings and this grows into something not even both of them expected. Oskar really liked Eli as it seemed to show that whatever reason Eli seem to tell Oskar he doesn’t mind one bit of it. In the end, Oskar runs away with Eli caring for her during the day while they cherish the nights together, though not explicitly said in the film.

What I really liked about the movie is that it sticks with the classical vampire lore. The title itself is a direct link to vampire lore where they could not enter somebody else’s abode without being invited in. This is also shown in a harsh way in the film where Eli comes in Oskar’s apartment without being invited in and blood gushes out from almost every orifice of her body. The well-known vulnerability of vampires to sunlight is given great air time here with the suicide of Lacke’s girlfriend. Basically the presence of a classic vampire is very much a plus for me.

What makes it a horror film is more on the premise and imagery in the film. Things that are disgusting and repulsive are shown almost most of the time. Blood is a prevalent image in the film. We see different ways where in blood is being procured, the cattle like draining and collection of blood by Hakan, the vampiric sucking of blood by Eli and there are other simple ones like the supposed blood pact by Oskar and Eli and Conny’s bleeding ear. Another main object here is the vampire herself. The violation of death of the vampire proves it to be something that is outside what is supposed to be and the mere fact that its sustenance is brought forth by the loss of blood of another is something pretty dreadful. The repulsion of the vampire is pretty much a hot case as shown in the film most of them reject it. The infected girlfriend of Lacke knowing that she is turning purposefully ends her life not wanting to be something of unlife. Eli herself does not want to be one as she stated that she only kills because she has to and not for some selfish reason.

Aside from the apparent imagery, the existence of obstacles to Oskar’s and Eli’s relationship proves to be another source of horror in the film. Such are the early warnings of Hakan, Oskar’s bullies and ultimately Lacke’s search for Eli. These can be horrific since we wouldn’t want something to get in the way of that sweet innocent relationship.

The film is a great film which showcases the flexibility of horror films. They do not always stem from generic scares and excessive gore. Certain images and situations bring about this sense of horror. Let The Right One In does this well and though having horror elements and romance elements the two mesh together well to create conflict and good plot. The film was a great way to end the course as it gives a good feeling afterwards and we know that it is a horror film.

Horror Film 12: Pontypool of Doom..Doom…Doom…D–

0

“Sticks and stones may break my bones but words can never hurt me”. The saying could be partly true for the film, Pontypool. Other than a medium for communication and conversation, language has carried something more dreadful in this film.

The film centers around the crew of a radio station who slowly discover the dreaded happenings that were occurring in their small town. It was supposed to be just another day for Grant Mazzy and his friends but soon the early morning snowstorm seems less worrisome as time goes by. While doing some news, they receive news about a riot happening in their town and they have an account given by witnesses, especially one from their own crew. They soon discover that the riot was acted upon by broken-record-slash-zombies. Things turn for the worse as these zombies start flooding their radio station and infecting one of them. Now all they have to do is figure out how to survive without turning into a zombie, a broken sound machine or both.

The film although has minimal portrayal of gore for a zombie flick, it still has its charm in the use of its lines and dialogue. For example, the first few zombie coverages of Ken Loney were chilling, it had the feel of a real account of a zombie sighting and his frantic speech to his ultimate demise leaves a lot the imagination. The most explicit scene would be the degradation of their infected friend, Laurel-Ann, displaying ample amounts of gore and soon expels a plethora of innards upon her death. The back and forth conversation between Grant and the doctor provides insight to the outbreak and gives light to the apparent cause of the zombification, the English Language.

I liked the film a lot and it gives a sense of confusion because of the premise, imagery and dialogue of the film. There’s a certain horror in the film as I seem to see that there are borders that kept getting invaded and violated. In the physical level, we always see the characters enclosed and seemingly separated from the invader but this slowly disappears as they are rampaged by zombies until they are isolated inside the sound booth, and again in the tool shed. What threatens them are kept away but nips away at the protection trying to get in, and this unnerves the characters and us as well, as we look on how they will survive in such a fragile looking enclosure. In another sense, the virus which spreads is invasive of a fact we call language. It manifests itself through babbles of infected words by the zombie. The existence of the virus is a violation of a border since in a different “space” of language, the virus cannot harm one. The presence of the language barrier suggests a border that can, yet again, be toppled but we do not see it, if the virus ever adapts. The virus can also be expelled from the person by confusing the understanding of the infected word making it incomprehensible, outside the border of understanding.

In the beginning and the end of the film, we are treated with something bizarre and confusing. It might be some kind of preparation and closure to the absurd premise of the film. After watching, I felt immense confusion but its okay because the entire film both made sense and none at all at the same time. Pontypool puts insane twists to the generic horror of the zombie.

Horror Film 11: May of Doom

0

No man is an island. Every human being needs human interaction outside the confines of home inorder to be a well-molded person in society lest they become awkward and isolated.  The film, May, plays around this human fact and creates a premise which is funny and yet disturbing at the same time.

In the film, we follow the misadventures of our heroine, May. She grew to be a very weird and awkward woman because of her wicked childhood. She had trouble making friends in her school because of her looks, her lazy eye. Her mother tried to help by giving her a “friend”, a doll named Suzie and leaves her with a quotable quote, “If you can’t find a friend, make one”. The doll was really misleading since it was emanating an air of spookiness but it served a different purpose in the film. The rest of the film deals with the awkward delusional life of May which all boils down to her loneliness and social awkwardness. This in turn proves to be the greater threat throughout the movie as she struggles to find someone who is perfect, caring and gets her for who she was.

The act of looking in the film is greatly exemplified as May focuses on things she likes and the perfections she wants. As we are seeing through May’s perspective, we see that she becomes fixated with certain parts of the body. The female gaze was attributed as something that’s curious, searching, and that’s how it was portrayed in the movie, she searches for the perfect someone that would understand her. But the more she looks, the more she discovers that there is nobody perfect enough for her as they all disappoint and hurt her because of who she is. And she sets off for a new search, a search for parts to create her perfect friend. The monster that returns the gaze was May herself, she has turned into an atrocious killer who takes what she thinks as “perfect” parts. As she looks at these perfections, it exemplifies the imperfections that she has and it horrifies her, the lack of friends, the betrayals, her lazy eye. In the end, the monster consumes May, it gouges her eye and allows her to bleed to death for a moment of reprieve with the doll she has created.

The film, in my opinion was a great film. It plays slightly with the mind and gives a disturbing feel to it. The scenes range from weird, absurdly funny to downright graphic and repulsive. The way it converts a simple lonely girl looking for a companion into someone dreadfully horrifying is quite the sight to behold.

Horror Film 10: Halloween of Doom

0

The type of horror movie that seem closest to reality are the slasher films. No matter how absurd the stalking menace seems to be, the reality of death comes across in a a very familiar form. The deaths and kills are more of a criminal act than what we can say a ghost attack or a monster maul. We sense great fear from this horror genre because this stuff happens though not as exaggerated as the art form.

The thing is with the slasher films, they always victimize teens and more often than not they have the so called “final girl”. This started as a shy away from the classic horror movies where the victims would be the general public. In the modern era slasher films, the aim was to cater to the youth, the young, the teenagers. And so, the turn them into meat waiting to be butchered.

The 2007 film Halloween is a remake of a very famous slasher series wherein we have the iconic killer, Michael Myers. Not so different from your typical slasher film, but this time around a backstory for the villain gives light to the terrible deeds he would soon act upon. But it was awfully disturbing because the foundations of his killing spree started as a wee little lad. The opening scenarios stands as a justification for what would transpire for the remainder of the film, more slaughterfest.

One thing I found really noticable whenever Micahael executes people is that the women have a harder time before they take their final breath. They bleed, they crawl, they squirm and struggle harder than the men in the movie. The men get surprise euthanasias up and about but the women really suffer alot. It might be for the very purpose of effectively conveying the horror as the helplessness of women strikes a certain string in our nerves. Also it seems to exemplify the coldness and lack of emotions of the psychopath as the flooding emotions of the woman falls on the deaf ears of one giant killing machine.

Halloween is really a great film on its own. As a remake, it sticks to its roots, keeping the good parts and at the same time offers something new and interesting to the plot. Though I dislike graphic kill scenes, Halloween does it well with justification. With streams of blood, senseless violence and a screams of terror, this remake puts Michael Myers back in the limelight.

 

 

Horror Film 9: Innkeepers of Doom

0

Slow and dragging in the beginning but picks up the pace of supernatural horror by the middle. The film, the Innkeepers, goes on such a track but manages to bring about horror in the same way the Asian Horror film “The Ring” dished out its own. The feeling of dread and fear stays for a while after the film. For me, it lasted a few days with me keeping the lights on before going to sleep because that midnight bed scene hit me so hard the scene flashes every time I’m about to lie down to bed.

The thing about supernatural horror is that the characters feel more and more helpless as they experience more manifestations. All they can do is run once the supernatural starts to stalk them. As a viewer, you root for them to escape,since fighting back is hardly an option, but rarely are there ghost movies where they are able to suppress or repel the ghost. The same goes with the Innkeepers, the ghost gets the best of us.

Following the concept of the female gaze, this film does a lot to justify it. We have our heroine bravely stalking the ghost of Madeline o’ Malley, a woman who hung herself after being stood up at her wedding. As in the cases presented by the article, she acts on her curiosity and tries to get a hold of the situation, try and prove things for herself. But in the end, her active pursuing soon turn grim as the ghost returns the favor and starts to wreak havoc on her remaining days in the Yankee Pedlar Inn. Her act of “gazing” at the horror triggers a punishment for assuming such a position in the course of the film. As the film puts it, the female gaze works well as a tool for horror as it is a futile attempt to suppress the helplessness of the female and lets the emotion, horror, pass through the screen as effectively as possible.

In totality, the film is a really good horror movie. It may be slow in progression of the plot but once it gets its engines running, the fright train might run you down. I really liked the movie and it is a horror movie that I would say was immensely effective in its delivery of horror. In my opinion, the movie was very effective, interesting and great all at the same time. So great that I would rather not watch it again, atleast for a very long time.

Horror Film 8: Another [REC]ording of Doom

0

They say “what you see is what you get”. But when the light stops you from seeing, how can you find what you’re looking for?

[REC] 2 was a film which follows the events of the previous films. It takes great leaps in providing a great explanation for what was going on in the first film and builds with that to create and interesting bond between science and faith. The film extends the cause of the infection to an unbelievable case of demonic possession which the new set of characters would soon find out. [REC] 2 makes use of clever ideas that truly expands the lore of the film series.

As a sequel of a good movie, I found [REC] 2 just as satisfying to watch compared to its predecessor. It manifests previous characters into roles which are not the typical foreboding types that warn others of what they experienced. Instead they are still involved with the story and play a role that is critical to the plot. It also immerses us once again in the same setting which shows places that are familiar while keeping it fresh by adding twists and new imagery all throughout. But a fallback from the previous film that I found hardly likable is the introduction of expendable characters that provide little to no progress to the plot and you just feel sorry for them for just a short while.

The film focuses on what the person sees and what he cannot see. As viewers looking through a first person perspective, we delve in with them as they see for us and themselves what horror they were pursuing. The sense of sight serves as a catalyst for the events in the film as things only seem to happen in the face of the camera. The characters in the film were continuously searching for something in a place so desolate and dangerous. This was further emphasized in the fact that they were actually in the right place in the very beginning of the film. When they learn how to “see”, the events took a darker turn.

Overall, the film was a great follow-up to a great “zombie” flick.  Its draws from what was established in the first film and adds its own charm to it. Though the science-religion combination maybe strange and inappropriate for some, I liked it a lot since it provides a different take to the zombie genre.

Horror Film 7: The Voice of Doom

0

Sound travels the material plane as much as any physical manifestation. Voices, in this case, typically emanate from a physical medium, again; typically human. But sounds and voices mingle closely with horror as it plays with one of our key sensory factories, hearing. Something unnatural as hearing voices out of thin air is an experience that can send your spine a-tingling. There’s a saying that goes “Beware disembodied voices”.

The film revolves around the ghost of a student whose singing voice was a treasure to behold. The ghost and a friend, she endearingly approached and frightened, now set on a quest which soon proved to be more than what mere conversations between the two of them bring across. The film does create a frightening experience but gives a more disturbing feel.  A key idea in the film which goes well with the saying above and whatever deceit lies with the ghosts movie is that “ghosts remember only what they want” as much as what they want to convey. As the film slowly unravels the real happenings surrounding our little ghost, we start to see how much reality is imbued in her words and how much of the truth she did not want to recall.

In a variety of cultures, ghosts usually represent great emotions or bearers of their “unfinished busines”s in the mortal world thus leading them to remain anchored to it. The spirit is trapped to the physical plane until the accomplishment of the deed is done or the absolution of the emotion is reached. Pertaining to the film, the ghost is trapped within the school that she goes to. As a ghost, the physical plane is generally unaware of her existence, except for her friend. The friend exists as her window out of her prison where she can seemingly act free from her entrapment. In a sense, her ghost existence serves as a subconscious repression of memories she deemed insignificant to her unlife  since it has not much to do with her” business”. But as soon as she finds out that in her life she has caused indirect abuse to people, instead of having a realization, a more violent manifestation of what she has done emerges from her ghastliness.

In my opinion, the film is not meant to be frightening but more of horror which tends to disturb and disrupt the audience by means of  portraying human emotions which explode in a violent behavior.